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Abdal-Hakim Murad

The Sunna as Primordiality

By Shaykh Abdal Hakim Murad (Tim Winter).
Twentieth-century Western art is not a subject for which we Muslims have much time. The alert among us are conscious that it neatly represents the decline of the Western Christian worldview…

Shaykh Abdal Hakim Murad on Islamic Education

“The region with the densest and most inventive Islamic education is Indonesia. There are over 100,000 Islamic colleges in Java alone; and many are pioneering new models of spiritually-rooted education that fights the modern tendency to fragment knowledge, by reuniting everything under the principle of Tawhid…”

Understanding the Four Madhhabs

the problem with anti-madhhabism by Shaikh Abdal-Hakim Murad © The ummah’s greatest achievement over the past millennium has undoubtedly been its internal intellectual …

Cultural Investment is the way forward

“We have the alternative of being Muslim extremists or being extremely Muslim. And I don’t accept the category of “moderate” at all because it is far from clear. Because when it is used usually by Western pundits and politicians, what is intended is anything other than a form of Islam that politically doesn’t obstruct present Western policies…”

A warning we should heed

“The message of Islam is that pursuit of money for its own sake is unnatural, inhumane, and will lead us to catastrophe…”

British and Muslim?

“Islam’s presence in Britain is not an Islamic problem. Islam is universal, and can operate everywhere. It is not an Islamic problem, but it may be a British problem. Europe, alone among the continents, does not have a longstanding tradition of plurality. In medieval Asia or Africa, in China or the Songhai Empire, or Egypt, or almost everywhere, one could usually practice one’s own religion in peace, whatever it happened to be. Only in Europe was there a consistent policy of enforcing religious uniformity…”

The Rainbow Culture of Islam

“The early Muslims who conquered half the world did not set up soapboxes in the town squares of Alexandria, Cordoba or Fez, in the hope that Christians would flock to them and hear their preaching. They did business with the Christians; and their nobility and integrity of conduct won the Christians over…”