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Short Khutbah

Eidul Adha khutbah

By Arshad Gamiet
“With so many Muslims enduring unspeakable hardship in so many places today, the blessings, the barakah, and the spiritual lessons of Hajj are desperately needed by all. Just like Nabi Ibraheem, let us willingly sacrifice our time, money and material possessions that we love so much, to serve Allah. This is the true meaning of Prophet Abraham’s prayer:

“Innas salatee wa nusukee wa mahyaya wama maatee lil Laahi rabbil aalameen”

“Surely, my prayer, my sacrifice, my life and my death is for Allah, the Lord of all the Worlds”

Sunni, Shi’a, Sufi or Salafi: Who is a real Muslim?

by Arshad Gamiet
“For the first time in 1400 years, scholars from Sunni and Shia, true Sufi and and true Salafi traditions came together to clarify these 3 vital issues: (1) Who is a Muslim? (2) Are Muslims allowed to declare other Muslims as apostates [to call them Kafir; to commit Takfir] (3) and finally, what are the qualifications to issue a Fatwa [a legal ruling]. The 200 leading scholars from around the world all came to a unanimous agreement on these vital issues……

A short khutbah on the Hajj

By Arshad Gamiet
“Hajj is an outward journey tracing the spiritual history of Islam. It is also the inward journey each and every one of us must undertake, to find our own centre, in the Kaaba of our heart. What desires, what emotions and passions are still circling, making tawaaf around our spiritual heart? Thespiritual heart, the qalb is the locus of our personality. This is our real driving force. Let’s make sure that it is surrounded by loving thoughts of Remembrance of our most Beloved, Allah…”

Another khutbah for Eidul Fitr (revised for 2017)

By Arshad Gamiet
“Never ever fool yourself thinking you can’t change things. Don’t ever adopt a defeatist attitude. To despair and give up all hope is a grave sin. Life is a challenge, a test from Allah; and Allah’s help is always near…”

Last 10 days of Ramadan

By Arshad Gamiet
“The time was during the last ten nights of Ramadan in the year 610 and the place was in a cave on Jabal Nur, the Mountain of Light, near Makka. Here Jibreel took Muhammad sws, the son of Abdullah, in a tight embrace, and commanded him to “Read!”

The Night of a Thousand Months

By Sheikh Abdul Hamid Lachporia
“Beloved Ummatal Muslimeen! “Laylatul Qadr” means the Night of Grandeur, Excellence and Honour. Amongst the nights of Ramadan there is this Most Holy Night called “Laylatul Qadr”  a night that is noted for its Glory and great blessings. The Holy Qura’n describes it as being greater in blessedness and spiritual virtue than a thousand months which in turn means that it is greater than 83 years …”

Mid-Ramadan 2017

By Arshad Gamiet
“This struggle to cultivate self-discipline is not only for Ramadan. It’s a lifelong struggle. Shaitan will constantly try to tempt us and make our evil nature seem pleasing to us. But we must be on guard. Whenever an evil thought comes to mind, we must resist it. Take refuge in Rahman from the mischief of Shaitaan. If you forget Rahman, you’ll be left with Shaitaan…!”

Ready for Ramadan?

By Sheikh Abdul Hamid Lachporia
“O you who believe! Instead of telling Almighty Allah what we want, we should try to ask what it is that He wants for us, or wants us to do, in each situation. Sometimes He gives a very clear indication of what it is He wants us to do through inner conviction, through a verse of the Most Holy Qur’an, or an insight given through another person. When we are less certain, we can pray for what seems to be the best solution, acknowledging that Almighty Allah’s wisdom is perfect…

Welcoming Ramadan

By Arshad Gamiet
“Many of us think that Ramadan is a time to ‘go slow’ and to avoid exerting ourselves. Some of us would want to sleep all day until iftar. This is completely wrong. Ramadan is not a time for hibernation. That’s for the polar bears and grizzly bears in the cold north American winter. It’s not for wide-awake, Allah-aware Muslims!” Read more…

Prepare for Ramadan

By Atif Jung
“Fasting is not just about being hungry and thirsty. It’s about training ourselves to be constantly vigilant over our thoughts, words and deeds; it’s about being fully Allah-aware at all times. This is the real meaning of Taqwa…”